Handedness, language dominance and aphasia
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Handedness, language dominance and aphasia a genetic model by I. C. McManus

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementI.C. McManus.
SeriesMonograph supplements / Psychological Medicine -- 8
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14873183M

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The relation between language dysfunction and handedness was examined in a sample of 58 male schizophrenic patients. Severity and type of language dysfunction were assessed using ratings on categories of thought disorder derived from the Schedule of Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (Spitzer & Endicott, ). All but two aphasia-producing lesions were located in the perisylvian language-areas in right-handed as well as in nonright-handed patients. In one right-handed and one non-right-handed case the lesion was located in the supplementary motor area; our results correspond with Cited by: Neurolnychoiogta, Vol. 18, pp. to /80/ S/0 '~ pergamon press Ltd., Printed in Great Britain NOTE HANDEDNESS AND APHASIA:AN INFERENTIAL METHOD FOR DETERMINING THE MODE OF CEREBRAL SPEECH SPECIALIZATION RANDY L. CARTER,* MILES HO~t and PAUL SATZ~" Departments of Statistics* and Clinical Psychology, University of Florida, Cited by: Abstract. Study of the relationship between handedness and aphasia dates back at least to the time of Broca (). Hécaen and Sauguet () observed left-handers to recover more rapidly from aphasia than right-handers; Gloning and Quatember () observed left-handers to have more transient : Margaret A. Naeser, Joan C. Borod.

In the strongly left-handed subjects, % had left-side language cerebral dominance, % had bilateral cerebral representation and % had right-side cerebral language dominance. In mixed. A stroke of the dominant frontal lobe or the dominant temporal lobe can cause a condition called aphasia, which is a serious disturbance of speech and communication. But another important brain function is controlled by either the right side of your brain or the left side of your brain depending on your handedness. Handedness and the Brain. As is quite well-known, the brain is split into two roughly similar hemispheres, separated by the deep longitudinal fissure. Also well-known is that the brain is cross-wired, with the left hemisphere controlling movement on the right side of the body, and the right hemisphere controlling the left side of the body. Introduction. Aphasia is a language disorder acquired subsequent to brain damage that affects production and understanding of spoken and written language in varying degrees and patterns associated with the size and site of the lesion (see Symptoms and Neurological Correlates).Written and online examples of aphasic speech are available (see Aphasic Language Data Sets).

  Conversely, ipsilateral language lateralization and dominant motor hand control is the least common presentation in the non-right-handed, occurring only when language is completely right-lateralized. Thus it could be hypothesized that a pattern of ipsilateral hand and language dominance may be associated with susceptibility to this FTLD with abnormal tau motor speech by:   Consider language lateralization for this aspect. In nearly every right-handed patient, language localizes to the left cerebral hemisphere. I don’t always count on this for left-handed patients, where a quarter of patients are right hemisphere dominant or even have a more “distributed” language . Abstract. Study of the relationship between handedness and aphasia dates back at least to the time of Broca (). Hécaen and Sauguet () observed left-handers to recover more rapidly from aphasia than right-handers; Gloning and Quateraber () observed left-handers to have more transient : Margaret A. Naeser, Joan C. Borod. Additional Physical Format: Online version: McManus, I.C. Handedness, language dominance and aphasia. London ; New York: Cambridge University Press, ©