Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids
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Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids theory, experiments, and applications by Jozef Kowalewski

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Published by Taylor & Francis in Boca Raton, FL .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJozef Kowalewski, Lena Maler.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC
The Physical Object
Pagination426 p. :
Number of Pages426
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22726637M
ISBN 100750309644

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  Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids Pages pages Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields of science because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from studies of nuclear spin relaxation in by: 1. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields of science because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from studies of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. The first edition of this book, published more than a decade ago, provided an accessible and cohesive treatment of the field.   Kowalewski, J., Maler, L. (). Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from the study of nuclear spin relaxation in by: Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids: Theory, Experiments, and Applications forms useful supplementary reading for graduate students and a valuable desk reference for NMR spectroscopists, whether in chemistry, physics, chemical physics, or biochemistry.

From the book: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Volume 32 Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and gases. G. A. Webb and R. Ludwig Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids and gases. G. A. Webb and R. Ludwig No abstract available Download options Please wait Publication details Cited by: 2. Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids: Theory, Experiments, and Applications By Jozef Kowalewski and Lena Mäler (Stockholm University, Sweden). from the Series in Chemical Physics. Edited by J. H. Moore and N. D. Spencer. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group: Boca Raton, FL. xii + pp. $ ISBN Nuclear Spin Relaxation in Liquids: Theory, Experiments, and Applications, Second Edition - CRC Press Book Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields of science because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from studies of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. A momentum-dependent interaction has been used by Torrey to explain the Xe nuclear spin relaxation measurements of Carr and co-workers. T 1 is calculated here for this interaction for gases and liquids using the constant-acceleration approximation. The gas results are in good agreement with Torrey's exact calculation for a gas of hard spheres, and have the advantage of being usable with Cited by:

Greater than first order thermodynamic dependence of spin relaxation rates is interpreted as relaxation resulting from at least one mechanism additional to through-bond dipolar relaxation. In rigid portions of the cation, an additional spin relaxation mechanism is attributed to anisotropic effects, while greater than first order thermo Cited by: The use of nuclear spin relaxation measurements in the study of liquid crystal dynamics goes back only to , to work by Doane (1), Blinc (2), Cabane (3) and their coworkers. Practically all of the early work relied upon proton relaxation measurements (4,5), and several major mechanisms and relaxation pathways were identified for thermotropic Cited by:   Nuclear spin relaxation times have been measured for liquid CHFCl 2, the values of T 1H and T 1F between ° and °K at 27, 20 and 17 Mc, and T 2H and T 2F over the same temperature range at 20 Mc. The results of these measurements are discussed, and the following relaxation mechanisms are shown to be important: (a) intermolecular dipole—dipole interactions, Cited by:   1. Phenomenological theory of relaxation; 2. Random motion; 3. Equations of relaxation theory; 4. Dipolar interactions; 5. Relaxation by intermolecular dipolar interactions; 6. Relaxation by Intramolecular dipolar interactions; 7. Relaxation by scalar interaction; 8. Relaxation by chemical shift; 9. Relaxation by quadrupole interaction; Relaxation by spin-rotational interaction; Theory Cited by: